Posted in International Womens Day

Poem for #InternationalWomensDay – My Aunties Come from Yorkshire by Jonathan Humble

My Aunties Come From Yorkshire


I have a lot of aunties,

A dozen rare and best;

They’re spread around in t’county’s towns

Up north, south, east and west.


These aunties are quite feisty,

Formidable and tough.

In times of strife their pluckiness

Shines out when things get rough.


A case in point is Rita;

Demure and introvert,

Ostensibly a dear old thing

In pinny and tweed skirt.


But Aunty Rita’s fearless,

Despite her dodgy knees,

She treks up t’jungle rivers

In her slippers, saving trees.


With thick prescription glasses

And loosely held false teeth,

She’ll scale up t’steepest edifice,

Ignoring what’s beneath.


For Aunty Rita’s famous

Within that SAS;

No lurking foe could lay her low,

Or make her acquiesce.


If wading through a swampland

And struck by t’deadly snake,

She’ll give it what for with t’handbag

Then leave it in her wake.


She’s part of Yorkshire folklore,

With daring tales abound,

A place where dear old aunties

Can amaze, shock and astound.


© Jonathan Humble


Jonathan Humble is a teacher and a poet – his website can be found here.

Posted in International Womens Day

Poem for #InternationalWomensDay – To My Daughters, by Sue Hardy-Dawson

To My Daughters

Girls rejoice, I did not wish you other,
though there is so much blood from birth to birth,
and the moon’s monthly shadow, I love you.
Some say we have it easy here, some do.
At best it’s luck really. Then there’s the whole
in His own image thing. Give me a Her
sweet Mother Earth, Mother Nature, they scold
but at least they nurture. Brothers, fathers
you are still our blood sisters. Look to your
daughters, are they not both clever and so
beautiful? Do not squander such wise gifts
do not mock us, we cannot help our breasts
no more than you, your lack, remember this
even snakes have forgotten the apple.


© Sue Hardy-Dawson 2016


Sue’s lovely book, Where Zebras Go, Otter-Barry, can be found here.

Posted in International Womens Day

Poem for #InternationalWomensDay – Personal Preference by Helen Laycock


I don’t like pink or sparkly bling
or crowns and coronets or rings
or taffeta, or lace or silk
or sweet and frothy strawberry milk.
I don’t like lipstick, scent or soap
or notes in floral envelopes
or fairies, wands and glittered wings;
I’m just not into girlie things!
I like spiders, beetles, bugs,
hearty pats, not feeble hugs.
I like to climb and scrape my knees.
I’m not afraid of wasps and bees.
I like the space to say my piece,
to learn mechanics, smeared with grease.
I want to make things, find out more…
dice with danger, win, explore.
Please let me have the freedom
to take which parts I choose;
the world’s a gift to all of us
to cherish and to use.



© Helen Laycock


If you’d like to see what else Helen writes, here is a link to her website.

Posted in International Womens Day

Poem for #InternationalWomensDay ‘Girls of the Week’ by Michaela Morgan

Girls of the Week

Monday’s girl stands up proud.
Tuesday’s girl speaks clear and loud.
Wednesday’s girl likes to dream and ponder.
Thursday’s girl loves to wander.
Friday’s child can be slow – or speedy.
Saturday’s child will help the needy.
But the child that is born on the Sabbath day
is as good as the rest in every way.


© Michaela Morgan


From Reaching the Stars, Poems about Extraordinary Women and Girls, by Liz Brownlee, Jan Dean and Michaela Morgan, Macmillan.

Posted in International Womens Day

Poem for #InternationalWomensDay – Supermarket Blues by Carole Bromley

Supermarket Blues

I don’t want to be adorable,
I want to be a high flyer,
I want to be as ugly as I like
and zoom over the rooftop
of the person who thinks
it’s a cute idea for girls
to wear pink and for boys
to hog all the other colours
in the rainbow I’ll fly over
not wearing the frilly top
with the soppy mouse on.


© Carole Bromley


Carole’s website is here. Her book, Blast Off, can be bought here.

Posted in International Womens Day

Poem for #InternationalWomensDay – The Battle of the Sexes

Battle of the Sexes

Bobby Riggs, a 1939 tennis champion, unwisely asserted that the female tennis game was inferior and that a top female player could not beat him. In 1973, Billie Jean King, who fought constantly for recognition and equality for women in sport, accepted his challenge, determined to beat him. She felt it would set the progress of women back fifty years if she lost and affect all women’s self-esteem. In front of a worldwide television audience of almost fifty million, she beat him easily. The match was called ‘The Battle of the Sexes’.


Bobby Riggs, tennis champ,

said a woman couldn’t

beat a man . . .


Billie Jean King, tennis champ,

in three straight sets, showed

a woman can.


© Liz Brownlee


From Reaching the Stars, Poems about Extraordinary Women and Girls, by Liz Brownlee, Jan Dean and Michaela Morgan, Macmillan.